Perhaps I should have bought a GT....

Ampere

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This may not be technically possible, but it's a sacrifice I'd be willing to make. It kind of reminds me of something I once read in a Ray Bradbury science fiction story. I'd be happy for Lucid to take two years off my battery warranty in return for increasing my range by 20 percent. I don't know if this is possible simply with a change in the software algorithm. In retrospect, I wish I had bought the Grand Touring. It kind of irks me that I could now buy a GT for the same price as I paid for my Touring and receive the GT's extra 100 mile range.
 
This may not be technically possible, but it's a sacrifice I'd be willing to make. It kind of reminds me of something I once read in a Ray Bradbury science fiction story. I'd be happy for Lucid to take two years off my battery warranty in return for increasing my range by 20 percent. I don't know if this is possible simply with a change in the software algorithm. In retrospect, I wish I had bought the Grand Touring. It kind of irks me that I could now buy a GT for the same price as I paid for my Touring and receive the GT's extra 100 mile range.
NEVER LOOK BACK!!!!
 
You sort of can. Set the daily charge rate to 100%. That will increase your range, but decrease the life of your battery. Just what you want, right?
The 100 percent charge won't add the 50 miles I need. I already charge to 100 percent when taking trips of over 200 miles. Sure I also could run the battery down to 5 percent as well and quickly destroy it.
 
The 100 percent charge won't add the 50 miles I need. I already charge to 100 percent when taking trips of over 200 miles. Sure I also could run the battery down to 5 percent as well and quickly destroy it.
We are in this boat where we live when heading north east to any degree. The charging stops are just infrequent enough that only suboptimal charging stops exist when in the GT-P with 21" and maybe the GT too.

In fact, I suppose that is and will be our constant state of existence until infrastructure improves.

The battery packs have minimal buffers already. A real with the devil would be Porsche's approach: Charging speed over battery longevity. Supposedly the new Porsche charges even faster (or faster for longer?) then the current model, and there is no data to speak of at the moment about the effect on battery of the current model. I am not sure what the trade-off is.

Some recent studies suggest DC charging has negligible effects due to modern battery conditioning. In other words, if the system can keep the heat down, then charge as fast as you want without popping cells like popcorn.
 
This may not be technically possible, but it's a sacrifice I'd be willing to make. It kind of reminds me of something I once read in a Ray Bradbury science fiction story. I'd be happy for Lucid to take two years off my battery warranty in return for increasing my range by 20 percent. I don't know if this is possible simply with a change in the software algorithm. In retrospect, I wish I had bought the Grand Touring. It kind of irks me that I could now buy a GT for the same price as I paid for my Touring and receive the GT's extra 100 mile range.
Are you on 19's?
 
The 100 percent charge won't add the 50 miles I need. I already charge to 100 percent when taking trips of over 200 miles. Sure I also could run the battery down to 5 percent as well and quickly destroy it.
I would do this anyways and see if you can get the battery replaced under warranty at the end 😁
 
I would do this anyways and see if you can get the battery replaced under warranty at the end 😁
My guess is charging to 100 and draining to 5 or less regularly would do little damage, anyway. Comparatively. But I’m not going to put money on that.
 
Yeah, when we make the trip to Santa Barbarba, we always have to charge a little before heading back. Range anxiety is real. Under the best of conditions, we could make it back without charging with about 15 miles left but going through the San Fernando Valley and Pasadena traffic kills efficiency.

On a side note, I thought that this thread was going to be about NACS based on the title🤣
 
Is this your car RM-S8?
This is pretty funny.
The trunk snip with all the AA-batteries overflowing, that's me with .308 ammo (I live in PA). Btw, wifey is a very bad shot, that's why we have no neighbors around us :)
 
This is pretty funny.
The trunk snip with all the AA-batteries overflowing, that's me with .308 ammo (I live in PA). Btw, wifey is a very bad shot, that's why we have no neighbors around us :)
How many bullets did she put in the Lambo? 🤣
 
Going down to 5% or even 0% isn't really bad unless you keep your car idle at those levels for extended periods, especially in the cold. In all practical use cases, you charge immediately afterwards, so really nothing to worry about.
 
Going down to 5% or even 0% isn't really bad unless you keep your car idle at those levels for extended periods, especially in the cold. In all practical use cases, you charge immediately afterwards, so really nothing to worry about.
Not sure if it is true for our Lucid but our Genesis GV60 warns owners that when the SOC is below 20% the HV battery will not charge the 12 volt battery. So if you leave the car below 20% SOC for an extended period of time your 12 volt battery could be dead.
 
Not sure if it is true for our Lucid but our Genesis GV60 warns owners that when the SOC is below 20% the HV battery will not charge the 12 volt battery. So if you leave the car below 20% SOC for an extended period of time your 12 volt battery could be dead.
that must be a unique to genesis, I've never heard of that on any other EV, I've owned 6 over the last 12 years
 
that must be a unique to genesis, I've never heard of that on any other EV, I've owned 6 over the last 12 years
Yes, that’s a really poor 12v management scheme. I never had my Genesis electrified G80 that low, so I never saw that warning. I never saw it with any of my prior EVs and several of them did get below 20%. So I assume that was not the case with those.
 
I would do this anyways and see if you can get the battery replaced under warranty at the end 😁

I think Lucid uses the same warranty criterion as Tesla: the battery has to lose 70% of its original capacity to qualify for replacement under warranty.

The good news -- or rather the bad news when it comes to this strategy, I guess -- is that it is very, very hard for modern battery packs to lose this much capacity even when subjected to a lot of stress as there are so many safeguards built in with heat management, charging curves, buffers, etc.
 
I think Lucid uses the same warranty criterion as Tesla: the battery has to lose 70% of its original capacity to qualify for replacement under warranty.

The good news -- or rather the bad news when it comes to this strategy, I guess -- is that it is very, very hard for modern battery packs to lose this much capacity even when subjected to a lot of stress as there are so many safeguards built in with heat management, charging curves, buffers, etc.
I think you mean lose 30% of its capacity. Thus the new capacity of 70% would meet the definition of replacement.
 
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