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Rear Seating

Hawk

Active Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2020
Messages
142
We travel with our two beagles and their two cages (which fold flat) We need the relatively flat space to fit everything in. I am very disappointed that Lucid decided to ignore rear passenger comfort just so they could claim the 500 mile range.
On the positive side I did get my deposit back in days. When I cancelled my deposit on the Tesla Roadster it took almost 10 phone calls and 3 months to get them to finally give me back the money.
In the meantime I am thinking about ordering a Taycan Turbo and if Lucid gets its act together I can also switch then.
Just received my deposit back as well. Only took three days.
 

Hawk

Active Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2020
Messages
142
Hallelujah!!! Lucid finally changed the pic of the rear seat area on the configurator. The rear seat pic now clearly shows the correct variant without the rear footwells. However, the Santa Monica interior pic on the options side panel has still not been corrected.

Rear leg room dimension in Specs is still the same - 35.8"

The glass canopy also appears to be more heavily tinted than it was before?
 
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hmp10

Active Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2020
Messages
271
Thanks for pointing this out.

I wonder if this is the final word on the rear footwells? If so, it appears that Lucid decided not to cup out the bottom of the front seats to allow for stretching the legs more forward to help lower the knee position. I wonder if they altered the rake of the rear seats?

I guess there's nothing to do for it but wait for this version of the car to show up at a Design Studio and see if it actually works for those worried about rear seat comfort.
 

Hawk

Active Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2020
Messages
142
I emailed my sales associate to ask those very questions. I'll let you know if he has anything useful to say.
 

hmp10

Active Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2020
Messages
271
I sent this to Lucid Sales today with a request for the specific dimensions indicated. I don't doubt the Air will have plenty of longitudinal room between the front and back seats. I'm more concerned about long periods of unsupported thighs, which was the issue that appeared in the two videos of reviewers sitting in the back seat with their knees jacked up. I'll post any response I get.
Screen Shot 2020-10-21 at 2.08.42 PM.png
 
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hmp10

Active Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2020
Messages
271
I just had a wide-ranging discussion about the Lucid Air with Zak Edson, the head of Marketing and Sales at Lucid. He was laudably forthcoming with information about what is and isn't yet determined about the Air. Here's a synopsis of the discussion:

The rear floorboard in cars with the larger battery pack will be 3.15" higher than in cars with the smaller battery pack. The 1.6" legroom difference between the packs shown on the Specs page of the Lucid website is due to a difference in measurement methods. The Dream Edition will be available only with the larger battery pack. While the Grand Touring will premiere with only the larger battery pack, the smaller pack will become available later. However, the power output with the smaller pack will be less than the 800 hp output with the larger pack due to voltage differences.

For others such as I who have been confused by conflicting video shots and comments about rear legroom from video reviewers, here's the story. The configuration of cars at press events does not necessarily track the production versions. At the September 9 reveal, the white car had the larger battery pack, and the gold car (though a Dream Edition) had the smaller pack. At the Manhattan press event, the Zenith red car had the smaller battery pack (though billed by the reviewer as being the 517-mile-range version).

The front seats will leave toe room for rear seat passengers, the height of which will diminish slightly as the front seat is run further backward. However, a key measure of leg comfort is the angle at the knee joint. A Tesla Model S has a knee angle of 89.8º and the Lucid an angle of 95.2º with the larger battery pack. Though nominally small, the difference actually contributes significantly to seating comfort. Combined with the greater length of the Air cabin compared to the Model S, the rear seating position with the larger battery pack should be comfortable for even tall passengers.

Some other questions Zak answered:

The Air will have regenerative braking set up for one-pedal driving (like Tesla and unlike the Porsche Taycan).

The rear seat will have a fold-down center armrest, although the cars initially on display at Design Studios probably will not have them.

Although the Air will have soft-close doors at the start of production, the full power-operated doors will not be available initially, due to delays in the supply chain.

The car will not have full-spectrum active noise cancellation mentioned in early promotional material. This is due to the hardware and software complexity of such systems in a car environment. However, the Air was benchmarked against the Mercedes S Class for NVH (noise, vibration, and harshness), and the Air numbers are better.

Closing impressions:

While I have been as frustrated as anyone by internally-inconsistent information on the Lucid website and elsewhere about the Air, I am convinced this is the result of an organization running in a hundred directions at once as it tries to communicate with the market about a car still undergoing development. My conversation with Zak Edson today, as well as the frequent contacts I've had with his Sales organization, signals to me a company that is extraordinarily attuned to the customer. While they can't give everyone everything they want in a car, they're putting Herculean effort into understanding those desires.

I don't know what I'll finally decide once I try on a Dream Edition for size at a Design Studio, but I truly want the Air to work for me. I think the Air is a technological tour de force, and I think the organization is determined to put a quality product on the road.
 
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LucidDreams

New Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2020
Messages
11
I just had a wide-ranging discussion about the Lucid Air with Zak Edson, the head of Marketing and Sales at Lucid. He was laudably forthcoming with information about what is and isn't yet determined about the Air. Here's a synopsis of the discussion:

The rear floorboard in cars with the larger battery pack will be 3.15" higher than in cars with the smaller battery pack. The 1.6" legroom difference between the packs shown on the Specs page of the Lucid website is due to a difference in measurement methods. The Dream Edition will be available only with the larger battery pack. While the Grand Touring will premiere with only the larger battery pack, the smaller pack will become available later. However, the power output with the smaller pack will be less than the 800 hp output with the larger pack due to voltage differences.

For others such as I who have been confused by conflicting video shots and comments about rear legroom from video reviewers, here's the story. The configuration of cars at press events does not necessarily track the production versions. At the September 9 reveal, the white car had the larger battery pack, and the gold car (though a Dream Edition) had the smaller pack. At the Manhattan press event, the Zenith red car had the smaller battery pack (though billed by the reviewer as being the 517-mile-range version).

The front seats will leave toe room for rear seat passengers, the height of which will diminish slightly as the front seat is run further backward. However, a key measure of leg comfort is the angle at the knee joint. A Tesla Model S has a knee angle of 89.8º and the Lucid an angle of 95.2º with the larger battery pack. Though nominally small, the difference actually contributes significantly to seating comfort. Combined with the greater length of the Air cabin compared to the Model S, the rear seating position with the larger battery pack should be comfortable for even tall passengers.

Some other questions Zak answered:

The Air will have regenerative braking set up for one-pedal driving (like Tesla and unlike the Porsche Taycan).

The rear seat will have a fold-down center armrest, although the cars initially on display at Design Studios probably will not have them.

Although the Air will have soft-close doors at the start of production, the full power-operated doors will not be available initially, due to delays in the supply chain.

The car will not have full-spectrum active noise cancellation mentioned in early promotional material. This is due to the hardware and software complexity of such systems in a car environment. However, the Air was benchmarked against the Mercedes S Class for NVH (noise, vibration, and harshness), and the Air numbers are better.

Closing impressions:

While I have been as frustrated as anyone by internally-inconsistent information on the Lucid website and elsewhere about the Air, I am convinced this is the result of an organization running in a hundred directions at once as it tries to communicate with the market about a car still undergoing development. My conversation with Zak Edson today, as well as the frequent contacts I've had with his Sales organization, signals to me a company that is extraordinarily attuned to the customer. While they can't give everyone everything they want in a car, they're putting Herculean effort into understanding those desires.

I don't know what I'll finally decide once I try on a Dream Edition for size at a Design Studio, but I truly want the Air to work for me. I think the Air is a technological tour de force, and I think the organization is determined to put a quality product on the road.
Thank you for keeping the Lucid community informed with such well-written and informative posts. You are a real asset to this forum.
 
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