What's new

Exclusive First Look | 2021 Lucid Air Dream Edition

Hawk

Active Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2020
Messages
142
When I inquired about the Warranties not being disclosed; I was shocked at the response. The response was, we should have that info before the end of the year. We will dribble out the info just like we did prior to the reveal last evening. I simply asked, so you expect us to commit to buying a $169k car and not know what the Warranties are? He responded that they would never ask us to do that.

The list grows longer. I'll give him a chance to respond to our questions, however, my patience is running out. At this point I'm hoping that Mercedes hits a home run with the EQS soon.
 

BlindPass

Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2020
Messages
90
Location
Cape Cod>Philadelphia>Chicago>Tampa>SWFL
One journalist said he was told yesterday that the first Dream deliveries wouldn't be until Q2, so that squares.

First I had to adjust to the disappointment that there would be no electrochromic glass in south Florida. Now my worry about rear seat foot room is apparently bearing out. Then came those huge, hideous sun visors glued to the windshield. (I'm mystified why no journalists have commented on them.)

The list of things I would have to tolerate or on which I would have to compromise is getting very long for a $169k car.

Given this chaos in September, I can't imagine what was on their minds in planning to launch the car at the April New York Auto Show.

One of the journalists today said the car revealed last night was a beta car that was about 95% production-representative. In one close-up I thought I could faintly make out a canopy dimming button over the rearview mirror. With another 3-month delay in rolling out the first production cars, maybe a couple of the shortcomings can still be addressed. I hold little hope, though, for the floorboard issue.
I can imagine for a new company there’s an element of never being “ready” for these things. 2020 hasn’t helped either.

But to not have answers and some possibly pending changes, would suggest Lucid is embracing the Silicon Valley tech startup approach to cars. They’re a California company, as they’ve remind us.

I’m not against that, it comes with benefits, but that kind of clashes with the expectations of buying an upmarket $170k car. At that price looking for value is my silliness, but there shouldn’t be headaches, compromises, or misunderstandings.

Alas, if they are responsive, pleasant, and end up making what I’m looking for in my next EV, I’ll be patient.
 

hmp10

Active Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2020
Messages
278
At least two journalists have already commented on the awkwardness of having to duck their heads to get into the driver's seat due to those extraordinarily thick roof rails.

One of the reasons the Tesla Model S, especially the early models, was so lacking in storage and things as simple as rear dome lights was that Musk got on a chic design jag and went too far in sacrificing function to form.

I had hopes that Lucid would not succumb to the same temptation. I'm now wondering if it was a forlorn hope. The decision to forgo a lateral roof rail over the windshield for no reason other than to tout a huge canopy has created the need for heavily beefed up longitudinal roof rails that interfere with ingress and egress and has left them with no place to hang sun visors. It might also be the reason for the lack of electrochromic dimming, as that would be the point where the fairly rigid electrochromic film would have to handle the sharpest curve. (Rivian, Mercedes, and other auto makers are succeeding in putting electrochromic film into their roof glass.)

I've spent the afternoon trying to get updated on what is now known about the MB EQS. I'm not excited about what I've found, particularly relating to range and performance, but it's back on the table for consideration. (They're apparently going to do a performance AMG version, but it's not expected before 2022.)

This is not the kind of day I was expecting to have after the reveal.
 

BlindPass

Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2020
Messages
90
Location
Cape Cod>Philadelphia>Chicago>Tampa>SWFL
At least two journalists have already commented on the awkwardness of having to duck their heads to get into the driver's seat due to those extraordinarily thick roof rails.

One of the reasons the Tesla Model S, especially the early models, was so lacking in storage and things as simple as rear dome lights was that Musk got on a chic design jag and went too far in sacrificing function to form.

I had hopes that Lucid would not succumb to the same temptation. I'm now wondering if it was a forlorn hope. The decision to forgo a lateral roof rail over the windshield for no reason other than to tout a huge canopy has created the need for heavily beefed up longitudinal roof rails that interfere with ingress and egress and has left them with no place to hang sun visors. It might also be the reason for the lack of electrochromic dimming, as that would be the point where the fairly rigid electrochromic film would have to handle the sharpest curve. (Rivian, Mercedes, and other auto makers are succeeding in putting electrochromic film into their roof glass.)

I've spent the afternoon trying to get updated on what is now known about the MB EQS. I'm not excited about what I've found, particularly relating to range and performance, but it's back on the table for consideration. (They're apparently going to do a performance AMG version, but it's not expected before 2022.)
I’m a little surprised a hatchback compromises torsional rigidity to such a degree greater than lacking a lateral roof rail over the windshield. But I’m admittedly ignorant.

I do like the look the removal of the rail provides, but they’ve got to finish it by figuring out how to hang sun visors like a $170k car. Or make glass that auto “removes“ the sun when looking at a similar angle
 

Hawk

Active Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2020
Messages
142
I've spent the afternoon trying to get updated on what is now known about the MB EQS. I'm not excited about what I've found, particularly relating to range and performance, but it's back on the table for consideration. (They're apparently going to do a performance AMG version, but it's not expected before 2022.)
Here's what I have for EQS:
- Dual Motors
- 469hp
- 560 pound-feet torque
- 100 kWh battery pack
- Range = 435 miles

Does this square with what you have?
 

hmp10

Active Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2020
Messages
278
Here's what I have for EQS:
- Dual Motors
- 469hp
- 560 pound-feet torque
- 100 kWh battery pack
- Range = 435 miles

Does this square with what you have?
It does. However, the 435-mile range is using the WLTP test which usually results in longer range than EPA tests. (WLTP tests assume more low-speed, stop-and-go driving than EPA tests, so WLTP particularly favors EVs, which get their best range in those conditions.) An EPA range would probably come in around 380 miles. In any case, that's enough range for most customers, including me.

It's the performance difference that would be really pronounced for me. Guesses for the EQS are around 4.5 seconds 0-60. That's peppy, but that's about all these days.
 

hmp10

Active Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2020
Messages
278
I do like the look the removal of the rail provides, but they’ve got to finish it by figuring out how to hang sun visors like a $170k car.
I was noodling this with my brother (a car junkie) today. Given how bulky they've made the mirror mount, maybe they could install a roller shade that you could pull from the mount and hook to a discreet latch on the side roof rail. Or maybe they could mount the visor on a swing arm that attaches to the side roof rail as it does in a Tesla Model X. (Many people find the Model X visor too small, but that could be rectified by making it a bi-fold panel. Actually, I've been flummoxed why Tesla doesn't to that. It just seems to be another of those easy interior fixes -- such as door pockets -- that Tesla never seems to get around to.)

Those visors in the Lucid look so absurd that I've wondered if they didn't just slap them on for the reveal while they figured out what to do before production starts.
 
Top